ARCHITECTURAL FORUM November 1935. Le Corbusier’s first visit to the United States; Municipal Incinerator at Shreveport, Louisiana

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THE ARCHITECTURAL FORUM: November 1935

Howard Myers [Editor]

Howard Myers [Editor]: THE ARCHITECTURAL FORUM. New York: Time, Inc. [Volume 63, No. 5, November 1935].  Slim Quarto. Thick wrappers. Wire spiral binding. 126 pp. Illustrated articles and advertisements. Wrappers lightly worn and rubbed. The spiral binding is in good condition and does not bind any pages when opened. A very good copy.

8.75 x 11.75 spiral-bound magazine with 126 pages of editorial content showcasing the Architectural and Industrial Design of the American Streamline Moderne Machine Age aesthetic. There are also an excellent assortment of vintage trade advertisements that espouse the depression moderne streamline aesthetic quite nicely. You have been warned.

CONTENTS:

  • Le Corbusier’s first visit to the United States: 2-pages with portrait and collected quotes. Mon Dieu!
  • Rockefeller Center, New York: Corbett, Harrison And MacMurray, Hood and Fouilhox: 13 pages and 26 photographs and diagrams.
  • La Salle Hotel Bar, Chicago: James Eppenstein, Architect; Harry’s New York Cabaret, Chicago: Graham, Anderson, Probst & White, Architects; Alfred Shaw, Designer; and The Yankee Grill, Chicago.
  • Municipal Incinerator at Shreveport, Louisiana:  a 7-page illustrated profile of the Municipal Incinerator by Jones, Roessle, Olschner and [Samuel G.] Wiener. Built with PWA funds, the Incinerator was the first major American building of its kind where complete design and supervision service was provided by a firm of architects. Selected as one of the buildings illustrated in the United States Pavilion at the Paris International Exposition of 1937, as well as a traveling exhibition organized by the Museum of Modern Art. "If I had any gold medals to distribute, I would quickly pin one on Jones, Roessle, Olschner and Wiener for their Municipal Incinerator at Shreveport, Louisiana. This one of the best examples of the rational use of the ribbon window and the overhanging building, with the ground floor accessible to vehicles that I have come across -- an excellent design, with no vulgar attempts at prettifying a form that needs no additions. -- Lewis Mumford. The Incinerator was razed in 1974.
  • Fair Oaks, Glencoe, Illinois: B. Leo Steif & Company, Architects.
  • Historic American Buildings Survey: Beauregard House, New Orleans, La.
  • Small Houses By Verna Cook Salomonsky, Maxwell Norcross, John Donald Tuttle, Oliver Reagan, And Reinhard M. Bischoff.
  • Month in Building
  • Forum of Events
  • Products and Practice
  • Books
  • Letters from Antonin Raymond, etc.

“A serious menace to health and falling property values caused the rapidly growing city of Shreveport to discontinue depositing garbage and rubbish on dumping grounds and to build this modern incinerator,” according to the Public Works Administration. Built with PWA [Project 3068, La.] funds at a total cost, including paving, garage, and architects’ fee, of $183,008, the Incinerator was the first major American building of its kind where complete design and supervision service was provided by a firm of architects. Selected as one of the buildings illustrated in the United States Pavilion at the Paris International Exposition of 1937, as well as a traveling exhibition organized by the Museum of Modern Art.

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